2017-2018 Season


American Theatre Company announces the 2017-2018 season

American Theatre Company announces the 2017-2018 season, the 48th, of five exciting shows.  The season consist of three Tony Award winning shows with a total ten Tony’s between them.  Leading off the season is season’s before last Tony winner for best musical, Fun Home by Allison Bechdel, a fresh and brilliantly told memoir from a cult favorite graphic novel artist, marked by gothic twists, a family funeral home, sexual angst, and great books.  It was nominated for twelve Tony Awards, winning five, including Best Musical.

 

As she works on her memoir in the present day, successful middle-aged cartoonist Alison Bechdel recalls two time periods in her life. The first is her childhood, around age 10 (Small Alison), when she struggles against her father Bruce’s obsessive demands and begins to identify her inchoate sexuality. The second is her first year in college (Medium Alison), when she begins her first relationship.

 

ATC’s own A Christmas Carol, by Robert Odle and Richard Averill, returns for the 41 rendition.  Dickens weaves the heartwarming story that offers hope through the tale of one lonely humbug who is given the rare chance to change his life and find his heart.   Revisit or start your family family tradition this holiday season.  A Christmas Carol was written by Charles Dickens in a six-week period in October and November in 1843.  It’s a story of generosity, family and good will.  After the Guthrie Theatre, American Theatre Company’s A Christmas Carol is the second oldest production in the country, according to American Theatre Magazine.

 

Leading off the new year is this year’s Tony winner for best play, The Humans by Stephen KaramIt’s Thanksgiving and the Blake family gathers at the run-down Manhattan apartment in Chinatown of Brigid Blake and her boyfriend. Brigid’s parents arrive from their home in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to have dinner with Brigid, and their other adult daughter. Brigid is a musician and Aimee is a lawyer, living in Philadelphia. Aimee has recently broken up with her girlfriend and has developed an intestinal ailment.  Also present is Erik’s mother, who has Alzheimer’s Disease. The parents are unhappy that their daughters have left home and have abandoned their religion. The family members must deal with “aging, illness, and a changing economy”.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf by Edward Albee, also a Tony winner for best play, arrives in May.  Albee’s classic drama about a bitter, aging couple, with the help of alcohol, use a young couple to fuel anguish and emotional pain towards each other.  George and Martha stumble home from a faculty party at the university where George teaches. Right away we get the sense that they’re not the happiest couple in the world – in fact they seem to be rather bitter. Martha informs her husband that a young couple, Nick and Honey, are coming over for a few after party drinks. The doorbell chimes and the scene is set for alcohol, agony, and some serious emotional devastation.

 

Closing out the season on the lawn and under the stars at Philbrook is Shakespeare’s The Tempest.  A storm is brewing at Philbrook. The Tempest  is set on a remote island, where Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place by using illusion and skillful manipulation.  He conjures up a storm, the eponymous tempest, to lure his usurping brother Antonio and the complicit King Alonso of Naples to the island. There, his machinations bring about the revelation of Antonio’s lowly nature, the redemption of the King, and the marriage of Miranda to Alonso’s son, Ferdinand.  Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and a picnic basket to the lawn at Philbrook.

 

For more information call 918-747-9494.

American Theatre Company announces the 2017-2018 season

 

American Theatre Company announces the 2017-2018 season, the 48th, of five exciting shows.  The season consist of three Tony Award winning shows with a total ten Tony’s between them.  Leading off the season is season’s before last Tony winner for best musical, Fun Home by Allison Bechdel, a fresh and brilliantly told memoir from a cult favorite graphic novel artist, marked by gothic twists, a family funeral home, sexual angst, and great books.  It was nominated for twelve Tony Awards, winning five, including Best Musical.

 

As she works on her memoir in the present day, successful middle-aged cartoonist Alison Bechdel recalls two time periods in her life. The first is her childhood, around age 10 (Small Alison), when she struggles against her father Bruce’s obsessive demands and begins to identify her inchoate sexuality. The second is her first year in college (Medium Alison), when she begins her first relationship.

 

ATC’s own A Christmas Carol, by Robert Odle and Richard Averill, returns for the 41 rendition.  Dickens weaves the heartwarming story that offers hope through the tale of one lonely humbug who is given the rare chance to change his life and find his heart.   Revisit or start your family family tradition this holiday season.  A Christmas Carol was written by Charles Dickens in a six-week period in October and November in 1843.  It’s a story of generosity, family and good will.  After the Guthrie Theatre, American Theatre Company’s A Christmas Carol is the second oldest production in the country, according to American Theatre Magazine.

 

Leading off the new year is this year’s Tony winner for best play, The Humans by Stephen KaramIt’s Thanksgiving and the Blake family gathers at the run-down Manhattan apartment in Chinatown of Brigid Blake and her boyfriend. Brigid’s parents arrive from their home in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to have dinner with Brigid, and their other adult daughter. Brigid is a musician and Aimee is a lawyer, living in Philadelphia. Aimee has recently broken up with her girlfriend and has developed an intestinal ailment.  Also present is Erik’s mother, who has Alzheimer’s Disease. The parents are unhappy that their daughters have left home and have abandoned their religion. The family members must deal with “aging, illness, and a changing economy”.

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